Getting Lucky in Asia

Get your heads out of the gutter!  I’m not talking about sex here……..we’re going to talk about ways to increase your luck.

1.    Pet Turtles

Have you ever wanted a turtle as a pet? Well…turns out that’s not such a great idea.  Turtles have uneven patterns on their shells and that’s a big no no for having good luck.  If you keep your pet turtle at work, you’re inviting a huge amount of yang energy into your workplace which could cause your business to fail.

2.    Chopstickschopsticks

Who knew there were rules about your chopsticks….have you ever wondered why no one sticks their chopsticks out of their food like a beacon?  Yeah definitely not a good idea.  Chopsticks closely resemble the incense you burn in memory of loved ones who have passed on; so when you stick them straight out of your bowl, you’re practically asking for bad luck and you look like a disrespectful idiot to boot!

3.    No Shave November?

One of my favorite times of the year is No Shave November; shaving is super tedious so any excuse not to is a welcome one in my book.  In parts of Asia, facial hair is seen as something for the lower class.  Any facial hair, particularly mustaches, that is untrimmed makes you look very unkempt but is also said to lower your social status and bring misfortune to your family.  So no matter how tedious it is, if you want to have good luck you may want to keep yourself well-groomed, fellas.

4.    Isn’t That Just a Number?

The number four is perhaps the most unlucky number in Asia.  Here in America we try to avoid the number 13 because it means horror, misfortune, and death in pop culture; in China, their unlucky 13 is the number 4.  The pronunciation of this number in Chinese is very similar to the pronunciation for the word ‘death’ and that’s a good enough reason to avoid it in and of itself.

In tall buildings, a lot of times they won’t even have a fourth floor because it’s so unlucky.  It is also unacceptable to use the number 4 on hotel rooms, apartment numbers, and and license plates.

cat5.    The MVP of Minerals

If you want to have supreme good luck, you should keep a jade figurine or pendant at your desk.  Jade is said to bring good fortune and prosperity so in China it is more precious than even gold.  Who doesn’t want good luck and prosperity after all?

6.    Spring Cleaning

If you feel a sudden urge to sweep during Chinese New Year, ignore it the best you can.  Sweeping during Chinese New Year means you are brushing away any good fortune or luck you could have received.  Get this…..if you hit someone with a broom, it is the penultimate form of misfortune and your life will be ruined.

On another note, do all your sweeping the night before Chinese New Year so the good luck for the new year has a clear path to you.

7.    Noodles

Have you ever been eating noodles and you get a really long one so you cut it with your teeth against your bottom lip?  If you ever have, stop doing it! Noodles are often eaten on birthdays or during important celebrations because they represent long life.  When you cut that noodle with your teeth, you’re symbolizing cutting life short.  Even if you have to slurp your noodles to avoid such an occurrence, that’s okay because in Asia that just means you’re enjoying your meal.

8.    The Most Symmetrical

In America we have lucky number 7, in Asia it’s lucky number 8.  Besides being the most symmetrical number, you pronounce the number 8 very similarly to the word ‘prosperity’ and that’s definitely something good to have.  So if you get the chance, stay in a room with 8 in the number; unless it’s room 48…..that pretty much cancels any good luck.

~ Jordan

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